Yasmin

Yasmin is an oral contraceptive used to prevent pregnancy. It prevents ovulation and also changes the lining of the uterus to prevent male sperm from entering and attaching. Yasmin is sometimes used to combat acne in girls over the age of fourteen, by decreasing the substance that causes acne.

Yasmin is also used to treat the many symptoms of PMDD.

Important Information About Yasmin

Do not take Yasmin if you are pregnant. This medication should not be taken if you suffer from any of these conditions: gallbladder disease, history of stroke, diabetes, extreme high blood pressure, blood clots, circulatory problems, disease of kidney or liver, cancer of the uterine or breast, heart valve disorder, abnormal vaginal bleeding, disorder of adrenal glands, migraine headaches, seizure or epilepsy, or birth control related jaundice.

Before Taking Yasmin

Yasmin contains drospirenone and ethinyl estradiol, so do not take it if you are allergic to these substances. Discuss any medical condition you have with your doctor before beginning Yasmin.

Yasmin is classified as pregnancy category X. If you become pregnant while taking Yasmin, contact your doctor immediately. Yasmin may be released through breast milk, so you should not take this if you are nursing.

When Taking Yasmin

Yasmin should be taking in the dosage and manner prescribed by your doctor. Depending on your doctor’s instructions, you will start the pack of Yasmin the day you start your period, or on the Sunday immediately following the start of your period.

Your dosage is one pill per daily. Try to take the pill at the same time each day. When the pack runs out, you will begin the new pack the following day so that no days are missed. Store your pills in a cool, dry place. Room temperature is recommended.

Breakthrough bleeding may occur when taking Yasmin. If it becomes excessive, consult with your doctor. Let any doctor or specialist you see know that you are taking Yasmin. This is especially important if you are scheduled for any kind of surgery or testing. While taking any birth control, you should see your doctor regularly. Doing monthly self breast exams is also important.

In Case of Missed Dosage

You increase your chance of pregnancy by missing even one dose of Yasmin. If you miss an “active” dose, take the pill as soon as you remember. If it is close to the time to take another dose, you can take both the missed pill and the pill for that day at the same time. You will not need backup birth control.

If you skip two consecutive pills during the first or second week of the pack, take two tablets for each of the next two days. That makes one tablet for that day, plus a tablet that was missed. You should utilize a backup method of birth control for the next seven days.

If you skip two consecutive pills during the third week, discard the remainder of the pack and start a new pack on the same day if you started the pills on the first day of your period. If you skip three pills in a row during the first two weeks, you also discard the remainder of the pack and start a new pack. In both instances, you start a new pack immediately if you started the pills on the first day of your period. If you started the pills on a Sunday, just continue with one pill a day where you are in the pack, and then start a new pack on Sunday. You will most likely not have a period during this month. If you miss two consecutive periods, call your doctor for a pregnancy exam.

Missing a pill during week four does not require making up the pills or using birth control since these are the “inactive” pills.

In Case of Overdose

Seek emergency medical attention in case of an overdose.

Things to Avoid When Taking Yasmin

If you smoke while taking Yasmin, it can increase your risk of having a heart attack, blood clots or stroke.